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Mandelbulb 3D Tutorial: Generating Tiled Images Using Big Render


I’ve recently been experimenting with a freeware app called Mandelbulb 3d, the version I’m using for the Mac is 1.8.9. Over the last week, I’ve discovered the use of the app’s Big Render option, which is just what it sounds — it allows the generation of really huge images, by rendering them piece by piece in m3i files, as tiles, and they may then be assembled into one large whole by one’s software of choice. I’ll describe how I rendered them below, after some video tutorials for the program’s basic operation. These videos are by Don Whitaker, and the software may be found here:

First, the base image was rendered at 800×600 pixels:Biggie_2X04Y04

Following are some screenshots of the settings I used to create it. Figure 1 is the main rendering window, the Lighting window is shown twice in Figures 2 & 3 for each the color settings used, the Formulas window is shown twice, Figures 4 & 5, for each of the two fractal types used and the means of combining them (They make up a hybrid fractal type, and those are always fun!). Figure 6 shows the Julia set coordinates used for this image (I used the “Julia on” option for this parameter set, because Julia sets are cool.).

Figure 1

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 2

Figure 3

Figure 3

Figure 4

Figure 4

Figure 5

Figure 5

Figure 6

Figure 6

But where to find the button that opens the Big Render window? Note Figure 1, at the top of the window. Under the “Utilities” tab, Big Render is the second button from the left. Click on that after rendering the base image once all its parameters are assigned and calculated. You are then ready to begin. Figure 1 was snapped during the rendering of the tile from column and row X=3 Y=1.

Screen Shot 2014-10-18 at 18.44.46

Figure 7

Note figure 7. Once you open it, note the button at the top right, “Import actual paras” clicking this will load the parameters of the base image. Here you see the Original parameter size given at 800 x 600 pixels. I did this to keep rendering time relatively reasonable, rather than using some giant monster base image that takes more than 30 minutes to render each individual tile.

Size factor as entered as x3, which would enlarge the fully assembled image to 2400 x 1800 pixels. Just above that, you see a “Big size” shown at 1200 x 900, assuming anti-aliasing at a factor of 2, which I did not use for this experiment, so that counts not. This winds up as the full scale indicated by the Size factor.

“Tiling” shows 4 horizontal x 4 vertical tiles, or 16 total. Note that each may be raised or lowered by clicking the upper or lower buttons to their immediate right, increasing the number of tiles and so rows and columns in the matrix of tiles to the right of Figure 7.

The Tilesize (including anti-aliasing, again if I were using that, which I’m not) is given as 300 x 225. All this means that the actual tile size during rendering is 600 x 450 pixels each.

Just below that, at “Saving:” the “Tile downscale, anti-aliasing” setting, shows here a value of 2. This too may be raised or lowered, as may the “sharp” setting, which I’m leaving at zero. No anti-aliasing needed here, though I recommend it for clearer images with cleanly defined edges and surfaces.

“Output image type” has three buttons, one for PNG files, one for JPEG, and one for BMP files. Here, I chose JPEG, though I’ve left JPEG quality at 95%. Meh!

Under “Output image type” I’ve clicked on Save m3i files. Do that, as it saves the parameters for each tile when it’s completely rendered and shaded in a file.

I’ve also clicked on “Render all tiles included in the lines:” and left the numbers here alone, from 1 to 999. Don’t worry about how high that last set of digits is as the app will stop rendering automatically upon completing the last tile on the last row and column.

Once you save the project in an appropriate folder, using the “Save project” button, second from the left at the top of the window, you are ready to begin.

Now click “Render next tile,” and the process will begin, generating m3i parameter files for each tile in the project folder you’ve saved. These files are just like the normal parameter files for MB3D, and like them may be opened and exported as image files using the main app.

One last thing: Look again to the right in Figure 7, the set of 16 tile boxes. When rendering and shading is complete, each tile box  turns from grey to white to indicate when it’s done, until all are complete. You can see that here, 11 tiles are fully rendered. Make sure you re-save the project once all files are rendered so you don’t lose them.

You may halt the rendering process at any point and save the project again, given at least one or more fully complete tiles, and then reopen the project later to pick up where you left off on unfinished ones.

This allows you to space rendering extremely large images with many tiles over a long period. Try to keep the base image size and number of tiles to be rendered reasonable, or the project well may take several days or longer to finish!

Just so you know:


This evening, at 18:00 EST, I’ll be taking down this blog’s About page to fix a major issue in viewing the text that was recently pointed out to me by a canny reader. I’ll be working on all of the page’s embedded images to revise the compatibility of text font with image backgrounds to enhance readability. That counts for more than any passing visual appeal. The page will be online again when revision is complete.

Thank you.

Caturday’s Astrophenia: 2014/08/23


G’day, and happy Caturday to you all. I’ve been working on increasing the already disgustingly large number of blogs I own, with the hub page for all public sites here, recently updating its theme to something a bit better. This Friday, I finally got around to creating the first of my private venues, here. It’s for material and tone that not only won’t fit well with other blogs, but also may be a bit…controversial…in a public forum.

I won’t be shy of expressing myself on this site, and neither should its readers. I do require that any discussion adhere to some level of decorum, and that all debate when it occurs be bloodless, honest, and relatively civil. I’ll follow that dictum as well. It is a blog, after all, not a warzone, nor the halls of the U.S. Congress or state legislatures.

Readership is open, and if you’ve any interest, feel free to hit me up by email or a comment on this post for an invite. That goes for any further private sites as well, as needed. WordPress might be a bit of a bastitch, and might not notify me of any requests made to the server.

I’ve got things planned for the week ahead, including some of the learning tools I’m using to learn Tamil, which I’ve been having a lot of fun with. I’m currently mastering the vowels in the language’s script, and the pronuciation of its syllables.

My evil cats have been doing quite well, and both of my boys are featured below, in this post. Stay cool, stay brilliant, or in a dialect of Kai’Siri spoken only on the edge of the Sagittarius spiral arm of the galaxy:

Talotaa frang.

Jupiter and Venus from Earth

Star Trails Over Indonesia

Contrasting Terrains on Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko

In the Center of the Lagoon Nebula

Venus and Jupiter at Dawn

Comet Jacques, Heart and Soul

The Spectre of Veszprem

Images of the Week:

Firestorm of Star Birth in Galaxy M33
Source: Hubblesite.org

Starburst Galaxy M82
Source: Hubblesite.org

Weekly Astrognuz:

Earth’s Ozone Under Attack Despite Banning Destructive Compound: Study

Rational Impact: Tattoo of a Skeptical Phrase

Surf Saturn’s Rings In Amazing Raw Cassini Images from This Week

IC 4499: Getting the age of a globular cluster

A Piece of Vesta Has Been Stolen!

Mars Curiosity: Celebrating 2 years on the Red Planet

Is A Sitcom Astronaut Hadfield’s Next Frontier? ABC Commedy in the Works, Report Says

Atmospheric CO2: Humans put 40 billion tons in the air annually

How Watching 13 Billion Years of Cosmic Growth Links to Storytelling

Titan weather: Clouds seen forming over a methane lake

Watch A ‘Swan’ Fly Free From Its Trap In A Space Robotic Arm

Fireball: Astronauts photograph Cygnus resupply ship burning up (Photo)

Remembering the “World War I Eclipse”

Helium: how do you wiegh a balloon?

Curiosity Brushes “Bonanza King” Target  Anticipathing Fourth Red Planet Rock Drilling

Asteroid 1950 DA: Impact in 2880 very unlikely

What is Nothing?

Ze Cats for Ze Caturday:

Thanks to Sharmishtha Basu for this idea!

Teh Fluffeh-Man Cometh, Teh Ebil Rockykins!

Teh Fluffeh-Man Cometh, Teh Ebil Rockykins!

Bath-Time for Mr Eccles

Bath-Time for Mr Eccles

Caturday’s Astrophenia: 2014/08/02


Image of Adromeda Galaxy in infrared.

Image of Adromeda Galaxy in infrared. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

G’day, and good morning! This week was good, with much of the blogging being done within the last couple of day’s or so. I’m spending some quality time with the cats, and doing well in study, as I’ve completed the political theory course I was taking, having debunked a few of my own misconceptions, and that’s always good!

I’m to bed soon, both to attempt to normalize my sleep cycles, and to get up early enough to see a movie later this afternoon. On the Algorithm, I’ve taken a look at the older installments of my ongoing book review series and will need to rewrite them. Yes, it’s that bad, even if I hate my own stuff anyway, these bear correction and additions not in the original drafts, so they are all pending for reposting when they are finished. That includes the yet-to-be published review of the 7th chapter of “Indra’s Pearls.”

I’m now studying from two more DVD format lectures, one to brush up specifically on my algebra skills, and another for recreational, introductory, and practical general math skills for college level. I plan on finishing the two courses simultaneously by the end of this month, but we’ll see. *tentacles crossed*

I’ve been visiting peeps’ blogs this week, and have plans for more of that this weekend and next week.

Talotaa frang.

Rho Ophiuchi Wide Field

The Horsehead Nebula from Blue to Infrared

A Sky Portal in New Zealand

M31: The Andromeda Galaxy

Veins of Heaven

Tetons and Snake River, Planet Earth

NGC 7023: The Iris Nebula

Images of the Week:

Interacting Galaxies Arp 147
Source: Hubblesite.org

Lined-Up Galaxy Pair NGC 3314
Source: Hubblesite.org

Weekly Astrognuz:

Explore Mars Group Wants To Build Instrument Seeking Subsurface Red Planet Life

Solar Storm: A massive 2012 CME just missed the Earth

Companion Planets Could Keep  Alien Earths Warm in Old Age

Ranger 7: Anniversary of the first close pictures of the Moon from space

Rosetta’s Comet is Too Hot for Complete Ice Surface, Probe Reveals

Double-ringed craters: Oblique view of a weird lunar impact

Hubble Spots Furthest Lensing Galaxy Yet 

Global warming: Inhofe still denying reality

Surprise! Classical Novae Produce Gamma-Rays

Geysers on Enceladus: Powered by gravity, heating the surface

NASA Announces Science Instruments for Mars 2020 Rover Expedition

Nocticulent Clouds: Photo Taken by an Astronaut

Numerous Jets Spied With New Sky Survey

Vitamin K: Parents refusing injections put babies at risk

This Model of Earth’S Giant Impacts Makes Us Wonder How Life Arose

Phobos transit: Martian moon travels across the Sun

New Image of Rosetta’s Comet Reveals so Much More

The Great Oxygenation Event: Earth’s first mass extinction

If You Mine an Asteroid, Who Does the Property Belong To?

Earth from space: Guadalupe island and a glory

NASA Space Sounds

Ze Cats of Ze Caturday

image 8

Fractals of the Week: In the Domains of the Imaginary


G’day. This week, the images don’t have any particular theme, but do share one particular thing in common: The parameters used to generate them used only imaginary numbers as the values in the formula terms. This allows me to take advantage of the cycling effect of powers of the number ‘i’ and also its multiples, leading to some very strange effects and vastly extending Fractal Domains usefulness for the foreseeable future. Here are a few of the results of last week’s tinkering…

I’ve included a wallpaper, the bottom image, free for personal use, at 1680×1050 pixels. click to enlarginate.

fholi

irigaa copy

jmydtcmhgfm

sprakka

All JPEG, PNG & GIF images in this post are original works by the author,created via  Mandelbulber, Fractal Domains, Ultra Fractal , and Mandelbulb 3D and are copyright 2014 by Troy Loy.

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