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Caturday’s Astrophenia: 2014/04/12


flurrdikon copyG’day. I’m posting this at the comic shop today in between lecture viewings. This week, something very strange has been announced… The discovery of a new type of quark — those are fundamental particles that make up most normal matter, such protons and neutrons, and they are bound together by the strong nuclear force — I avoided saying ‘nucular,’ because that would be silly and would elicit copious WTFs from you, and I don’t feel like jerking peoples’ chains right now. This discovery may have deep implications for astrophysics, but prophecy is a lost art, though I expect interesting things to be revealed from it nonetheless. May you enjoy what’s left of the weekend, and as always…

Talotaa frang.

Fresh Tiger Stripes on Saturn’s Enceladus

A Solar Eclipse from the Moon

M42: Inside the Orion Nebula

Two Rings for Asteroid Chariklo

Mars, Ceres, Vesta

Mars near Opposition

Clouds and Crosses over Haleakala

Images of the Week:

Hubble Sees a Horsehead of a Different Color
Source: Hubblesite.org

Galaxy M106
Source: Hubblesite.org

Weekly Astrognuz:

NASA Mulls Unplanned Spacewalk to Fix Space Station Computer Outage

Failed Space Station Computer Spurs Contingency Spacewalk Plans

SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft Packed with Big Science for Space Station (Infographic)

Backup Computer Glitches On Space Station But Crew Safe, NASA Says

‘Gushing’ Hot Plasma Erupts From Sun | Video

A Salad Bar for the Space Station

From Here to Mars: Senate Testimony of Astronaut Leroy Chiao

Follow-Up on Skydiving Meteorite: Crowdsourcing Concludes it Was Just a Rock

Project LIGO: How Lasers Could Reveal Glimpses of Gravitational Waves

Twin Peeks: Astronaut Brothers To Go Under Microscope During One-Year Mission

After The Flood: Ancient Waters Carved These Martian Channels

The Cosmos in Video:

Weekly Astrofave(s):

‘Super Planet Crash’ Game Lets You Build (and Destroy) Alien Solar Systems

Scientists Detect A Particle That Could Be A New Form Of Matter

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Caturday’s Astrophenia: 2014/04/05


Figure 5: NASA JPL to-scale size comparison of...

Figure 5: NASA JPL to-scale size comparison of Enceladus. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

G’day! I’m posting this from the comic shop this disgustingly fine afternoon, while getting things ready for study, practice of study and reading strategies, and getting in more reading.

This was a good week for the search for life on other worlds, with the discovery of an ocean on Caturn’s moon Enceladus.

I’m hoping that we find the political will to fund a mission there sometime soon, as well as further missions to Titan and the exploration of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

I’m a little curious though, about the proposed Martian cuisine for future colonists — grasshoppers and fungi — Sounds tasty, though that’s probably just the fact that I like mushrooms…not the recreational sort though!

Stay brilliant, O peeps, as the stars at night!

Io in True Color

2012 VP113: A New Furthest Known Orbit in the Solar System

Space Station Robot Forgets Key Again

Mars Red and Spica Blue

At the Edge of NGC 2174

Along the Western Veil

Lunar Farside

Images of the Week:

Spiral Galaxy M100
Source: Hubblesite.org
Jet in Carina
Source: Hubblesite.org

Weekly Astrognuz:

Is Andromeda Drifting Towards Us?

NASA Mars Rover Curiosity Scoping Out Next Study Area | NASA

Morpheus Lander Flies Again on ‘Green’ Fuel | Video

Stunning Aurora at Mount Kirkjufell in Iceland

Predicting Mars Cuisine: Grasshoppers with a Side of Fungi (Op-Ed)

El Gordo Galaxy Cluster Even Bigger Than Thought

India Launches Its 2nd Navigation Satellite

Could This Be The Signal Of Dark Matter? Unsure Scientists Checking This Out

US Air Force Launches New Weather Satellite Into Orbit

Sobering IPCC Report: “Warming is Unequivocal”

Will Ocean Discovery On Enceladus Spur Life-Hunting Missions to Icy Moons of Saturn, Jupiter?

NASA Announces ‘Take the Plunge’ Contest – Guess when LADEE Hits the Moon – Soon!

Hints of Dark Matter from Milky Way’s Center Revealed by Gamma-Ray Map | Video

Cassini Spacecraft Confirms Subsurface Ocean on Enceladus

NASA-Russia Breach Will Not Affect UrtheCast Cameras On Space Station, Company Says

The Cosmos in Video:

Weekly Astrofave(s):

How Hubble Successor Will Spread Its Wings Far From Earth | New Animation

Allan Adams: The discovery that could rewrite physics | Talk Video | TED

Weekly Space Hangout – April 4, 2014: Space Politics, Skydiving Meteor, and Enceladus Ocean

Dance Me to the End of Time and Space

Did a Skydiver Almost Get Hit By a Meteorite? (Video.)

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Caturday’s Astrophenia: 2014/03/29


English: The International Space Station is fe...

English: The International Space Station is featured in this image photographed by an STS-134 crew member on the space shuttle Endeavour after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 11:55 p.m. (EDT) on May 29, 2011. Endeavour spent 11 days, 17 hours and 41 minutes attached to the orbiting laboratory. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

G’day, and happy Caturday, such as that may be. This time, I’ve decided to go a little easy on the links, and for this and perhaps other of my blogs, I’ve decided to post a page discussing all plans and projections of online projects, both previously announced, and projects to come, to serve as a helpful reminder for me to get off my backside and complete them!

There’s my interest in setting up my own monthly satiric webcomic on the adventures of misfit mad scientist Doctor Incompetto (No, I’ve not forgotten, nor have I given up on this!), my learning of Indic languages, particularly Tamil and Hindi, my speculative fiction effort, the current endeavor of studying logical and cognitive fallacies in-depth, the revival of the City of Glass project for fractals, completing my fractal tutorials, my posting more often on mental health issues, and so on.

All projects dating from the beginning of my blogging career will be covered, added to as new ones catch my interest. Those I complete will be noted as such, and they will all be there to see, to hold me accountable to you, the readers.

The View Near a Black Hole

Orion and Aurora over Iceland

Orion Nebula in Surrounding Dust

M78 and Reflecting Dust Clouds

Stephan’s Quintet Plus One

Stripping ESO 137-001

A Milky Way Dawn

Images of the Week:

Hubble
Source: Hubblesite.org

Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 1300
Source: Hubblesite.org

Weekly Astrognuz:

Mars-Bound Comet Sprouts Twin Jets in Hubble Telescope Photos | Space.com

Rosetta Spacecraft Spies Its Comet As It Prepares For An August Encounter

Astronaut, 2 Cosmonauts Arrive at Space Station After 2-Day Delay | Space.com

Discovery! Possible Dwarf Planet Found Far Beyond Pluto’s Orbit

Pleiades Perfection: Amateur Astronomer Snaps Spectacular Photo of ‘Seven Sisters’ | Space.com

Surprise! Asteroid Hosts A Two-Ring Circus Above Its Surface

US Air Force’s Secretive X-37B Space Plane Shatters Orbital Endurance Record | Space.com

What Does the Grand Canyon Look Like from Space?

Astronaut Excited about 3D Printing on International Space Station (Video) | Space.com

Rocky Alien Planet Leftovers ‘Polluted’ White Dwarf Stars With Metal

NASA Narrows Asteroid Targets for Mission to Lasso a Space Rock | Space.com

Stunning 3D Tours of Two Well-Known Nebulae

Incredible Technology: Giant Starshade Could Help Find an Alien Earth | Space.com

The Cosmos in Video:

Weekly Astropicks:

Scientists Detect Direct Evidence of Big Bang’s Gravitational Waves | I Fucking Love Science

Fly through of the GAMA Galaxy Catalogue on Vimeo

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Caturday’s Astrophenia: 2014/03/15


I’m posting this a bit late for Caturday. My bad, but both yesterday and today, I was experimenting with my first animations via Mandebulber and iMovie, and while not pleased with the overrall results, I’ve a good idea how to make it work with future attempts, in which the quality of the result will actually be worth putting on my YouTube channel, and embedded on this blog in future fractal posts.

This Caturday has been a good if busy day, as the dawn of, here in the Northern Hemisphere, a new Spring, and a break from study for me, until I decide study would be more fun.

I’ll be working on my blog-project on argumentation (I’ve still yet to name it), my fractal tutorials, and study notes for my personal learning projects. Have a good Spring, or Autumn, depending on your hemisphere of residence, and reach for the stars!

A Hole in Mars

Gamma Rays from Galactic Center Dark Matter?

In the Heart of the Rosette Nebula

The Sun Rotating

Messier 63: The Sunflower Galaxy

Polar Ring Galaxy NGC 2685

Apollo 17 VIP Site Anaglyph

Images of the Week:

Hubble/GALEX/Spitzer Composite Image of M81
Source: Hubblesite.org

Planetary Nebula NGC 6543: Gaseous Cocoon Around a Dying Star
Source: Hubblesite.org

Weekly Astrognuz:

Sun Unleashes Intense Solar Flare as NASA Watches (Video)

Economics, water plumes to drive Europa mission study

New Comet Jacques May Pass 8.4 million miles from Venus this July

Hunt Is On for ‘Rogue’ Black Holes

Check Out NASA’s New “Dashboard” for Spacecraft Communications

Rare Diamond Reveals Earth’s Interior is All Wet

Watch Two Dark Moons Sneak Into Cassini’s Shots

NASA Offers Cash Prizes for Help Hunting Dangerous Asteroids

Astrophoto: Beautiful Encounter with the Leaning Tower of Pisa

What Would A Rocky Exoplanet Look Like? Atmosphere Models Seek Clues

Arecibo Observatory Back in Action Following Earthquake Damage

Space History Photo: Seymour Schwartz Conducts an Experiment at the ERC

Rocket Fail Video Shows Human And Technological Risk With Each Launch

‘Live from Space’ Lets You Track the International Space Station Online

Robonaut 2 To Toddle And Waddle Around Space Station This Summer

‘Live From Space’: How Astronauts Use Tech to Share Orbital Life with Earth

“Death Stars” Caught Blasting Proto-Planets

NASA Robot Aces Satellite-Refueling Test on Earth

How Do You Jumpstart A Dead Star?

Did Life On Earth As We Know It Come From ‘Geological Life’?

Malaysian Flight MH370: Join the Satellite Photo Search

How Giant Galaxies Bind The Milky Way’s Neighborhood With Gravity

NASA Joins Hunt for Missing Malaysian Jetliner

Physicists Reveal the Hidden Interiors of Gas Giants

NASA’s Powerful Mars Orbiter Sidelined by Glitch

Chinese Satellites May Have Detected Debris from Missing Malaysia Airlines Flight

SpaceX Delays Dragon Cargo Launch to Space Station Until March 30

The Cosmos in Video:

Weekly Astrofave:

COSMOS: A Spacetime Odyssey

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Caturday’s Astrophenia: 2014/03/08


Today begins the Cosmos marathon, all 13 episodes of the original series produced co-written by Ann Druyan and Steven Soter, and hosted by Carl Sagan, arguably the most publicly well-known astronomer of the late 2oth century. This leads up to the showing of the new Cosmos, hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson this Sunday on Fox. I must say, this is most sorely needed in this age of antiscience, and I hope those of you who can catch it in your locale enjoy it as much as I will. This is definitely something I plan on buying when the DVD version is released! May you feel large at being so small next time you look up at the stars, yet one out of uncountable trillions of ways for the universe to comprehend itself!

Part of Image:Planetary society.jpg Original c...

Part of Image:Planetary society.jpg Original caption: “Founding of the Planetary Society Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman, the founders of The Planetary Society at the time of signing the papers formally incorporating the organization. The fourth person is Harry Ashmore, an advisor, who greatly helped in the founding of the Society. Ashmore was a Pulitizer Prize winning journalist and leader in the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and 1970s.” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Martian Sunset

Habitable Worlds

Sun and Prominence

Globules in the Running Chicken Nebula

NGC 1333 Stardust

A View from the Zone

Mount Sharp on the Horizon

Dr. at the November 29, 2005 meeting of the NA...

Dr. at the November 29, 2005 meeting of the NASA Advisory Council, in Washington, D.C. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Images of the Week:

Hubble Sees a Horsehead of a Different Color
Source: Hubblesite.org

A Global Mars Map
Source: Hubblesite.org

Weekly Astrognuz:

Project ‘Red Dragon’: Mars Sample-Return Mission Could Launch in 2022 with SpaceX Capsule

Carl Sagan’s Legacy: Scientists, Fans Share Memories of Famed Astronomer

TV Show ‘Cosmos’ Gets An Epic Reboot This Sunday

Giant Planet May Be Lurking In ‘Poisonous’ Gas Around Beta Pictoris

Record-Setting 33 Tiny ‘Cubesats’ Launched From Space Station

See Light Pollution in Action

Facebook to Purchase Solar-Powered Drone Company

A Natural Planetary Defense Against Solar Storms

Space Camp Launches Crowd-Funding Effort to Land NASA Shuttle Training Aircraft

Astronauts Spend 3 Days In Below Freezing Temps For Survival Training | Video

Why Is This A Special Time For The Universe?

Evidence Of Giant, Growing Louisiana Sinkhole Showed Up In Radar Before Collapse: NASA

New Tool Will Catch Evolving Galaxies In The Act | Video

Rocket Launches Into an Aurora to Study Auroral Swirls

Space History Photo: Armstrong and Scott with Hatches Open

The Cosmos in Video:

Weekly Astrofave(s):

If the Moon Were Only One Pixel: a Scale Model of the Solar System

Carl Sagan’s Legacy: From the ‘Pale Blue Dot’ to Interstellar Space

NASA Spacecraft Buzzes Saturn’s Largest Moon Titan for 100th Time

Big Mars Impact Gave Earth Most of Its Martian Meteorites

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