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The Weekly Gnuz & Lynx Roundup: 2014/03/02


Radial Waves 1

Radial Waves 1

G’day, and it’s a new month. This last week was good, if a bit chilly here in the Northern Hemisphere, but wherever on the planet you live, I hope things went well for you. I’ve been fooling about on Twitter, a bit more active on there than I’ve been recently, and I’ll be doing #FFing throughout the week regardless of day.

I may be blogging for Monday and Tuesday this week, but that depends on workload and study time. Things are a bit iffy for posting during the week, but we’ll see.

I’d like to start new blog drafts while adding to those I have already saved on file, and I’ll be working on new large print-quality fractal about 3×3 ft to 5×5 ft, while doing research for a friend of mine — the process of finding the material is complete, until newer and better data comes along, of course. Only the scouring of details, followed by the organization and presentation of data remains to be done.

The cats are being their usual ebil selves, with Mister Eccles taking up most of my desk chair as I type this. As for the ‘Iko Iko’ parody posted this last Wednesday, the Dixie Cups et.al. have my apologies for mangling a perfectly good song with hideously unspeakable Lovecraftian madness.

Talotaa frang!

My Weekly Blogs Roundup

Roundup of The Other Blogs

The Odd, the Strange & the Sciencey

Weekly Blog Stats

  • 140,882 pageviews total,
  • 2,079 comments posted,
  • 2,298 entries posted, including this one,
  • 230 WordPress and email subscribers,
  • 2,125 Twitter fellows,
  • …and 533 Tumblr fellows

Last Week’s “I F***ing Love Science”

 

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[Review] Reality Check: How Science Deniers Threaten Our Future, by Donald R. Prothero


As a skeptic, I’ve an interest in pseudoscientific claims in general, and in those of it’s evil clone from an alternate universe of anti-reality, science denialism. Why the concern? Because denial of scientific facts that gets expressed as public policy is dangerous, especially in the case of modern medicine rejection, or denial of and inaction on environmental hazards.

Reality Check goes in-depth into antiscience in general, as well as specific varieties of science-rejection.

Prothero’s book begins a discussion of antiscience, its strategies and its tactics, moving to a description of science and it’s fundamental importance in our modern world, insights into its process and thinking, and then an expose of scientists who’ve betrayed professional integrity as paid shills of those with a vested interest in attacking science on financial and political grounds.

Next are the antiscience movements involved in discrediting concern for and action on environmental hazards, anthropogenic climate change, followed by the problems, rampant here in the United States of creationism, intelligent design, and evolution denial in general, and their well-funded connection with fundamentalist religion and business interests.

Also dealt with in some detail is denial of modern medical science, as with the dangers of AIDS denial, anti-vaccination hysteria, and the rejection of evidence-based medicine through unproven and disproven ‘alternative’ treatments, themselves often quite invasive and dangerous.

It then moves to astrology, peak oil denialism and it’s promotion by scientifically naive economists, and lastly to the threat of overpopulation on a world with finite resources and rapidly increasing human demands.

Finally, there is a warning of how science denial in a world depending utterly on science and technology poses a threat to our very survival as a species — Oh, sure, the planet and its life may survive in some form, but likely without us if we favor denial over skepticism, and ideology or emotion over facts.

The Author Online: Donald Prothero

“Donald R. Prothero is a Professor of Geology at Occidental College and Lecturer in Geobiology at the California Institute of Technology. He teaches Physical and Historical Geology, Sedimentary Geology, and Paleontology. His specialties are mammalian paleontology and magnetic stratigraphy of the Cenozoic. His current research focuses on the dating of the climatic changes that occurred between 30 and 40 million years ago, using the technique of magnetic stratigraphy….” see full text at http://www.donaldprothero.com/

Donald Prothero on Wikipedia

Donald Prothero on Skepticblog

Donald Prothero’s Amazon.com page

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The Weekly Gnuz & Lynx Roundup: 2014/02/16


Part of Image:Planetary society.jpg Original c...

Part of Image:Planetary society.jpg Original caption: “Founding of the Planetary Society Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman, the founders of The Planetary Society at the time of signing the papers formally incorporating the organization. The fourth person is Harry Ashmore, an advisor, who greatly helped in the founding of the Society. Ashmore was a Pulitizer Prize winning journalist and leader in the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and 1970s.” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

G’day, and happy Sunday! This last week, two big things happened:

First, I finally got to game again, and was able to give my old 2007 iMac to Christopher, over at Ravens ‘N Pennies, who decided it would make a good media center with it’s large monitor screen, and fair sound system. Second, it was the second week in a row that I’ve been able to blog thoughout the week on my new blogging protocol and still get things done.

Coolness.

There were pictures and videos taken during a walk on the beach this Friday, and some of those will make it to this weeks installment of Wordless Wotan’s Day. Ye Greate Olde Ones, I love my iPad… but enough of that for now. There will be more walking outside when the weather gets a little less chilly… *tentacles metaphorically crossed*

I found out that one of my friends, Carl, from over at Virginian Opinions, had been diagnosed with an unpleasant visitor of the carcinomic sort, and has recently undergone surgery to have it expelled.

Here’s hoping he recovers fully soon, without any recurrence, but one never knows. He’s been lucky to get this caught so early.

I’m currently on a project for creating a set of deckplans for a starship owned by one of my old SF villains, using a modified Mandelbox as a sort of biological cube. This coming Thursday I’ll post the results of the project, with the sliced images I’ll be using to draw the deckplans by hand. Should be a good opportunity to practice and try out my sketch tablet and software on the laptop.

I’ll also be doing more memes, and have posted two in the last week, both included with this post’s blog links. Whatever hemisphere you’re on, stay warm or cool as the case may be, and I’ll be back with Monday’s post, barring any weirdness.

My Weekly Blogs Roundup

*There are no such characters, but it would be frightfully silly and cute if there were.

Roundup of The Other Blogs

The Odd, the Strange & the Sciencey

This Week’s Blog Stats

  • 140,241 pageviews on this site,
  • 2,052 comments posted,
  • 2,282 posts published, including this one,
  • 229 WordPress and email subscribers,
  • 527 Tumblr fellows,
  • 2,134 Twitter fellows

Video(s)

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TED — Alex Wissner-Gross: A new equation for intelligence


Neil deGrasse Tyson on Mary Poppins, Kites and Physics


Reblogged from Brights — Die Natur des Zweifels Check them out!

 

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