Category Archives: Mind & Brain

Cannabis and Psychosis | C0nc0rdance


I don’t use cannabis, never have, and probably never will due to possible interference with my treatment plan and exacerbation of my condition. But I thought that this was interesting, relevant, and worth embedding here.

The narrator suggests checking out the studies he references yourselves, and fairly examining the evidence offered.

Courtesy of C0nc0rdance

Published on Sep 19, 2015

I’ll be recording a podcast on this topic with the League of Nerds this weekend, to be posted soon.
https://www.youtube.com/user/LeagueOf…

I invite you to read the same systematic reviews I did. Sources cited on-screen. I want to acknowledge that I borrowed heavily from Radhakrishnan et al 2014, including some whole sentences and phrases.

1. Front Psychiatry. 2014 May 22;5:54.
Gone to Pot – A Review of the Association between Cannabis and Psychosis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

2. Curr Addict Rep. 2014 Jun 1; 1(2): 115–128.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

3. Front Psychiatry. 2014; 5: 159.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

4. Front Psychiatry. 2013; 4: 128.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

5. Schizophr Res. 2013 Dec; 151(0)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

6. Psychol Med. 2014 Dec; 44(16): 3435–3444.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

7. Schizophr Res. 2012 Aug; 139(1-3): 157–160.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

8. Curr Pharm Des. 2012 Nov; 18(32): 5070–5080.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

9. Schizophr Res. 2008 Dec; 106(2-3): 286–293.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

10. Schizophr Bull. 2011 May; 37(3): 631–639.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic…

Learning Tamil: Vowels: Some Mnemonics I’ve Created


Checkerboards of The Gods

Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 19.34.13

English: Learning Hindi vowel through Tamil Hi... English: Learning Hindi vowel through Tamil Hindi vowel – 2. தமிழ்: தமிழ் உயிரெழுத்து வழியாக இந்தி உயிரெழுத்தைக் கற்றல்.(ஆ=2) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In my language studies, I’ve been learning the sounds and script of Tamil, a prominent tongue originating from the Indian subcontinent. Right now, I’m mastering the basic vowels, and to do this I’ve created mnemonics to assist my recall and recognition of the shape of each letter. All the better to read you, my dear!

The phrases in scare quotes are the ones I’ve come up with, and I thought here that I’d explain some of my reasoning behind them.

“Curly ‘d’ and ‘I'” : This comes from the shape of the lefthand side of the letter for the sound ‘A,’ which to me looks a lot like an elaborate lowercase letter ‘d’ the righthand side, which looks like an uppercase ‘I’ connected to the ‘d,’ with the ‘and’ supplying…

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Hooked on Mnemonics…Sort of


ytdydtdtdIn my informal studies, I’ve adopted the use of memory aids, mnemonic techniques to aid my recall of learned material, say, in a particular order of listed items, or supplementing the memorization of the main points of a text.

I’m currently using first-letter mnemonics, like the use of acronyms, like PEMDAS, to lay out the standard order of operations in mathematics, or Roy G. Biv for remembering the colors of the visible light spectrum, and for visual mnemonics, there’s this cute little one for memorizing the four ‘figures’ of standard form syllogisms in classical logic:

The Four Syllogistic Figures: Hey, Bowties Are Cool.
The Four Syllogistic Figures: Hey, Bowties Are Cool.

I did this one myself on my laptop’s Pages app in only a few minutes. Similar images are used in popular logic texts, like Copi’s Introduction to Logic, and the shirt-collar and bowtie shapes make an easy impression, though it’s important to remember the outer placement of the predicate terms (P’s)and subject terms (S’s)in the 2nd and 3rd figures relative to the M’s, the middle term in standard form syllogisms.

I’m new to the full use of mnemonics in study, that is, using them to best effect as standard tools, though there’s just no substitute in learning for ordinary memorization and comprehension of the material. The bowtie mnemonic depends on the student using it to come from a culture where shirt collars, and sometimes bowties are commonly worn as normal dress, but in that context, it’s useful and effective.

Different techniques for using these have different purposes, and as you may suspect, different strengths and limitations. The use of first-letter mnemonics works best when they are used as memory cues, not in learning new material.

I found out early on, though, that coming up with good, evocative, and meaningful mnemonics takes work — at least at first until you get the hang of it and know well the context of the material you’re studying.

If the material is new, and much of it is, of course, it’s often best to use brute force recitation, repetition, and review of the material, and to use mnemonics mostly as assistance to that, not a substitute.