Great Courses from the Great Courses® | The Big Questions of Philosophy


This course of 36 lectures is taught by Professor David Kyle Johnson of King’s College. It deals with the most perplexing ideas in philosophy, those which have yet to yield any definitive answers to our species’ inquiry. From the start on how we do philosophy and what it is, leading up to the biggest question …

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Course Review | Philosophy of Religion, by Prof. James Hall, Ph.D.


This course consisting of 36 lectures is a fairly comprehensive set of lessons, 30 minutes or so each, dealing with the conceptual intricacies of what could be called Ethical Monotheism, the sort of thinking involved in many sects of the Abrahamic religions of the West and Middle-East. For considerations of lecture time much of the …

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Course Review | The Philosopher’s Toolkit, by Prof. Patrick Grim


I've recently finished viewing and taking notes from this course, taught by Professor Patrick Grim of State University of New York(SUNY) at Stony Brook, who does a good job of conveying the lessons in this 24 lecture series from the Teaching Company. The course is about both how we do think, and how we can …

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Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies [by Lynne Kelly]


I've recently finished my first read of this book, written by Dr. Lynne Kelly, and a scholarly well-sourced work it is! It lays out a theory concerning the nature of certain archaeological findings, with no pseudoscience or other nonsense given serious attention, and those mentioned only in passing. It's a theory that draws analogies between …

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Vampires, Lovers and Other Strangers (by Andrew Scott Hall)


I’ve known Andrew online for several years now, and find his blog, Laughing in Purgatory quite entertaining for both it’s humorous and its more serious content. This book, his first release, is almost all about the Undead, the Leeches, the Nosferatu, in different settings and genre styles — almost all about — save the final story. It’s …

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